Frequently Asked Questions about Divert-X

How is Divert-X different from electronic bottle caps and time-access dispensers?

How will the data be analyzed?

How will patient confidentiality and privacy be protected?

How long does the battery last?

What stops the patient from disabling the device?

When will Divert-X be available?

Which medications will be packaged using Divert-X?

What happens if the Divert-X device is outside of a cellphone coverage network?

Is the device reusable?

Does use of the device inconvenience legitimate patients?


How is Divert-X different from electronic bottle caps and time-access dispensers?

Numerous solutions attempt to improve patient compliance to a prescribed dosing schedule.  Many types of electronic bottle caps exist, but these only collect information on opening and closing events – the content of the bottle is not monitored.  Divert-X collects data (time, geographic location, and other measures) for every dose removed because the pills and tablets are packaged individually.

Time-access medication dispensers - analogous to automated pet feeders – are available, but they are not used broadly. Divert-X contains no locking mechanism and does not interfere with patient access.


How will the data be analyzed?

The data will be analyzed by computer algorithms developed from data collected during clinical evaluation-beta testing. The ability of the system to correctly identify misuse and diversion will be quantified during product development.

The Divert-X medication-use risk scoring algorithm will be kept secret so that it can maintain its effectiveness.  As an analogy, the debt-repayment risk scoring algorithms (credit scoring systems) commonly used by banking and finance industries are secret so that they are not gamed.

Registered doctors and pharmacists will have secure access to the raw data, graphs and charts, and the risk score to monitor the patient’s compliance to the dosing schedule. The Divert-X data and behavioral inference will provide an evidence-based management tool to the patient’s healthcare providers. See How Divert-X Works.


How will patient confidentiality and privacy be protected?

The packaging will be registered to the patient without the use of name as the identifier. No personally identifiable information will be wirelessly transmitted. The database at the dispensing pharmacy will enable the link between the patient record and the behavioral data. The Divert-X system contains no patient-identifiable data.


How long does the battery last?

The Divert-X device is designed to minimize power consumption to enable battery life to support a full month’s prescription cycle.


What stops the patient from disabling the device?

The pharmacist will inspect the device for tampering before refilling the medication. Signs of tampering will become part of the decision-matrix at the pharmacy prior to continuation of dispensing to the patient. Patients will clearly understand that return of the device is a key part of the risk score.


When will Divert-X be available?

Vatex is currently seeking funding to complete Divert-X product development. Vatex projects commercial roll-out of Divert-X within two years.


Which medications will be packaged using Divert-X?

Our customers, that is the medical insurers and federal and state healthcare agencies, will dictate which medications are dispensed using the device. Probably the medications that are the most prone to abuse including painkillers, stimulants and sedatives will be the first to be packaged in this way.


What happens if the Divert-X device is outside of a cellphone coverage network?

The device will store the data generated by patient access to the medications and transmit the data once the unit is back in cellphone coverage.


Is the device reusable?

The wireless component is fully reusable once it is recharged and reactivated at a pharmacy. The blister-pack and other packaging are disposable but recyclable.


Does use of the device inconvenience legitimate patients?

The device does not interfere in any way with a patient's access to their medication. Its use will provide an evidence-based means to differentiate between legitimate patients and those who are misusing the medications. This capability to confirm which patients are real should improve medication access, and reintroduce trust between the patient and physician.



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